Tactical Ventilation Instructor

International Tactical Ventilation Instructor

Target Audience
Fire Officers from Junior to Senior Officer Rank that will be directly involved in development or delivery of training programs to operational firefighters, or responsible for the development and implementation of realistic training programs and facilities.

Training Method
The course consists of a combination of theoretical presentations, practical evolutions, classroom scenarios and practical exercises. Trainees are assessed on a daily basis by the Instructors. The course instructors are experienced in delivery strategies that will enhance the learning experience for learners that use English as a second language. A high standard of competence is set for the group and the program is designed to allow for sufficient repetition of the practical components.

Prerequisites  
International Compartment Fire Behaviour Instructor Level 1 or equivalent.
The trainees should be competent and experienced in:

  1. Firefighting strategy, tactics and techniques.
  2. English language skills. (It may be possible to provide translators for the theory and practical)
  3. Intermediate computer skills
  4. Instructional techniques.
  5. Medically fit for operational duties in accordance with fire service requirements

Theory Components
The theory component is designed to build on a solid practical firefighting background. While advanced, sufficient time is allowed to compensate for the fact that the trainees use English as a second language. A variety of assessment methods will be used.

Practical Components
The practical components will consist of workshops, realistic training sessions and tactical exercises. Trainees will be expected to be highly competent in the wearing of SCBA and familiar with all commonly used firefighting tools. 

 

1.     Understand the impact of any form of ventilation fire development 1.1  Explain the role air plays in the development of a compartment fire.

1.2  Explain the difference between air controlled and fuel controlled burning regimes.

1.3  Explain the role of air supply and flashover.

1.4  Explain the role of air supply and backdraft.

1.5  Explain how buoyant smoke flow can impact the likelihood of fire gas ignition.

2.     Understand the driving forces behind Natural Ventilation2.1  Explain how compartment fires may self- ventilate and the impact this will have on fire progression.

2.2  Explain the forces that influence natural ventilation.

3.     Understand Horizontal Ventilation3.1  Explain the most efficient method of moving smoke using horizontal ventilation methods, including the inlet to exhaust ratios and height differentials.

3.2  Explain the impact of wind on horizontal ventilation.

3.3  Explain the advantages and disadvantages of horizontal ventilation.

4.     Understand Vertical Ventilation4.1  Explain the most efficient method of moving smoke using vertical ventilation methods including inlet to exhaust ratios and their location.

4.2  Explain the impact of wind on vertical ventilation.

4.3  Explain the advantages and disadvantages of vertical ventilation.

5.     Understand Anti-Ventilation5.1  Explain the impact of reducing air supply by closing existing openings.

5.2  Explain the advantages and disadvantages of anti-ventilation.

6.     Understand the overall impact of Wind Driven Fires (WDF). 6.1  Explain the impact of a wind driven fire.

6.2  Explain the fire behavior indicators of a wind driven fire.

6.3  Explain the tactical options for dealing with WDF

7.     Tactical Synergy for Natural Ventilation7.1  Explain how Horizontal Ventilation, Vertical Ventilation and Anti-Ventilation can be combined in a manner that can increase the effectiveness of search and fire attack.

7.2  Explain how ventilation techniques can be combined with extinguishing tactics and techniques to increase efficiency and safety.

7.3  Cool before you vent options

7.4  Transitional Attack

7.5  Gas Cooling and Flame Cooling

7.6  3D Zone Control (Buffer Zone and Safe Zone)

8.     Understand the principles of Forced Ventilation8.1  Explain Negative pressure ventilation techniques.

8.2  Explain the basic principles of Positive Pressure Ventilation including variations in the inlet to exhaust ratio.

8.3  Explain the impact of variables such as fan design and siting can impact efficiency.

8.4  Explain the advantages and disadvantages of forced ventilation.

8.5  Explain techniques used in post fire ventilation.

9.     Understand the principles of using fans to pressurize uninvolved spaces9.1  Explain how fans can be used to prevent the flow of smoke into adjacent horizontal compartments.

9.2  Explain how fans can be used to prevent smoke flow into adjacent vertical levels.

9.3  Explain how fans can be used to pressurize stairwells in multilevel structures.

10.  Understand the principles of Positive Pressure Attack (PPA). 10.1 Explain the term PPA.

10.2 Explain the advantages and disadvantages of PPA.

10.3 Explain the necessity of the “4 Points of PPA” in ensuring that the plan is progressing as anticipated.

10.4 Explain implementation strategies that are required for successful progression to PPA.

11.  Demonstrate a range of small scale and cold exercises to demonstrate the learning outcomes defined in sections 1 – 7. 11.1 Students use a range of media to demonstrate the assessment criteria of sections 1-7. This can be anything from multimedia, small scale hot or cold demonstrations to large scale cold demonstrations.
12.  Demonstrate the use available large scale multicompartment and multilevel props to demonstrate the learning outcomes defined in sections 1 – 7.11.1 Students use a range of multicompartment and multilevel large scale props to demonstrate the assessment criteria of sections 1-7. This can be anything from cold smoke, hot smoke drums to moderate class A fuel fires.

11.2 Students will be assessed on the ability to meet the learning outcomes in a safe manner.

11.3 Where the facilities are not available, they must develop a model session plan that demonstrates their ability to use a large scale live fire facility in a safe manner.

13.  Demonstrate a range of small scale and cold exercises to demonstrate the learning outcomes defined in sections 8-10.13.1 Students use a range of media to demonstrate the assessment criteria of sections 8-10. This can be anything from multimedia, small scale hot or cold demonstrations, to large scale cold demonstrations.
14.  Demonstrate the use available large scale multicompartment and multilevel props to demonstrate the learning outcomes defined in sections 8 –10.14.1 Students use a range of multicompartment and multilevel large scale props to demonstrate the assessment criteria of sections 8-10. This can be anything from hot smoke drums to moderate class A fuel.

14.2 Students will be assessed on the ability to meet the learning outcomes in a safe manner.

14.3 Where the facilities are not available, they must develop a model session plan that demonstrates their ability to use a live fire facility in a safe manner.

Scroll to top